The NPR Politics Podcast The NPR Politics Podcast is where NPR's political reporters talk to you like they talk to each other. With weekly roundups and quick takes on news of the day, you don't have to keep up with politics to know what's happening. You just have to keep up with us.
The NPR Politics Podcast
NPR

The NPR Politics Podcast

From NPR

The NPR Politics Podcast is where NPR's political reporters talk to you like they talk to each other. With weekly roundups and quick takes on news of the day, you don't have to keep up with politics to know what's happening. You just have to keep up with us.

Most Recent Episodes

Weekly Roundup: Thursday, June 20

Former Vice President Joe Biden isn't backing down from his comments recalling the "civility" of his working relationships with two segregationist lawmakers. Plus, in a high profile case, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Thursday that a 40-foot World War I memorial cross can stay on public land at a Maryland intersection. This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, Congressional correspondent Scott Detrow, White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, and political editor Domenico Montanaro. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations.

Weekly Roundup: Thursday, June 20

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President Trump Officially Launches His 2020 Reelection Bid

President Trump officially launched his 2020 reelection bid on Tuesday at a massive rally in Orlando, though much of the event picked up where his 2016 campaign left off. This episode: Congressional correspondent Scott Detrow, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations.

President Trump Officially Launches His 2020 Reelection Bid

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Democratic presidential candidate Montana Gov. Steve Bullock during a campaign stop at a coffee shop on May 17 in Newton, Iowa. Steve Pope/Getty Images hide caption

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On The Trail With Democrat Steve Bullock: 'The Only One That Won A Trump State'

In an ongoing series, The NPR Politics Podcast is hitting the road and interviewing 2020 Democratic presidential candidates. This episode Scott Detrow and Iowa Public Radio's Kate Payne sit down with Democratic Gov. Steve Bullock to ask about why he's the best pick for president. This series is produced in collaboration with NHPR and Iowa Public Radio.

On The Trail With Democrat Steve Bullock: 'The Only One That Won A Trump State'

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Weekly Roundup: Thursday, June 13

President Trump says he might be open to taking information from a foreign government in a future election, calling it a part of politics. But the law draws a distinction when foreigners are involved. Plus, the Democratic National Committee announced Thursday the final list of presidential candidates who will take the stage at the first primary debates. This episode: Congressional reporter Kelsey Snell, national political correspondent Mara Liasson, political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, political ediotr Domenico Montanaro, political reporter Tim Mak, and national security editor Phil Ewing. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations.

Weekly Roundup: Thursday, June 13

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Democratic presidential candidate and Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., spoke to the NPR Politics Podcast about abortion access, the economy and trade, on Sunday in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Harris: Justice Dept. 'Would Have No Choice' But To Prosecute Trump After Presidency

In an ongoing series, the NPR Politics Podcast is hitting the road and interviewing 2020 Democratic presidential candidates. In this episode, Scott Detrow and Iowa Public Radio's Clay Masters sit down with Democratic Sen. Kamala Harris to ask about why she's the best pick for president. This series is produced in collaboration with NHPR and Iowa Public Radio.

Harris: Justice Dept. 'Would Have No Choice' But To Prosecute Trump After Presidency

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House Votes To Let Its Leaders Pursue Contempt Lawsuits In Trump Inquiries

The House has authorized its committee leaders to pursue civil contempt cases to get information for their myriad investigations into President Trump. This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, political reporter Tim Mak, and national security editor Phil Ewing. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations.

House Votes To Let Its Leaders Pursue Contempt Lawsuits In Trump Inquiries

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Weekly Roundup: Thursday, June 6

President Trump is threatening to place tariffs on Mexico to try to stop the flow of migrants across the border, but Congressional Republicans question how that will help stop the influx. Plus, Congress puts big tech companies on notice. This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, Congressional reporter Kelsey Snell, national political correspondent Mara Liasson, White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez, and political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations.

Weekly Roundup: Thursday, June 6

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How Did Mitch McConnell Become One Of The Most Powerful People In The World?

Mitch McConnell has been described as "opaque," "drab," and even "dull." He is one of the least popular - and most polarizing - politicians in the country. So how did he win eight consecutive elections? And what does it tell us about how he operates? NPR's Embedded deep dived into the man and the politician. This episode: political correspondent Scott Detrow, Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, and Embedded host Kelly McEvers. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations.

How Did Mitch McConnell Become One Of The Most Powerful People In The World?

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Weekly Roundup: Thursday, May 30

President Trump responded to special counsel Robert Mueller's statement and the team discusses the politics surrounding calls for impeachment proceedings. The Democratic National Committee released new rules for getting on stage for the debates in September. This episode: political correspondent Scott Detrow, national political correspondent Mara Liasson, political editor Domenico Montanaro and political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations.

Weekly Roundup: Thursday, May 30

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Robert Mueller, Long Silent, Speaks — Then Says It Was His Final Word

Mueller addressed reporters at the Justice Department in his first public statement since taking over the Russia investigation, ending two years of near-silence even under one of the hottest spotlights ever to burn on a public figure. This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, Congressional reporter Kelsey Snell, and national justice correspondent Carrie Johnson. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations.

Robert Mueller, Long Silent, Speaks — Then Says It Was His Final Word

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