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Cell phone variety from old obsolete to modern equipment. EduLeite/Getty Images hide caption

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#772: Small Change

How fast is the world really changing? The answer has implications for everything from how the next generation will live to whether robots really will take all our jobs.

#772: Small Change

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#606: Spreadsheets!

The creation of the electronic spreadsheet transformed industries. But its effects ran deeper than that.

#606: Spreadsheets!

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#771: When India's Cash Disappeared, Part Two

What happened when India's Prime Minister declared most of the paper money in India worthless? We travel to India to see what happened after the country's demonetization.

#771: When India's Cash Disappeared, Part Two

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Anil Bokil, a mechanical engineer by training, had a plan for demonetization. He presented it to now Prime Minister Narendra Modi in 2013. Chhavi Sachdev /NPR hide caption

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Chhavi Sachdev /NPR

#770: When India's Cash Disappeared, Part One

Something incredible happened in India about six months ago. The government declared most of the paper money invalid. Demonetization they called it. Today, we meet the man who came up with the plan.

#770: When India's Cash Disappeared, Part One

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Economists have a yearly job market that works a little bit like speed dating. Gary Waters/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Gary Waters/Getty Images/Ikon Images

#769: Speed Dating For Economists

We visit a job market created by economists, for economists. It's a hyper-efficient, optimized system, tested by game theorists, tweaked by a Nobel Prize winner, but it requires comfortable shoes.

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Former Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

#768: A Chat With Ben Bernanke

Ten years ago, two little-known funds at Bear Stearns blew up, and the financial crisis was on its way. Today, we ask the person at the center of it all, former Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke, why it happened.

#768: A Chat With Ben Bernanke

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English economist John Maynard Keynes attends the United Nations International Monetary and Financial Conference at the Mount Washington Hotel in New Hampshire. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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#553: The Dollar At The Center Of The World

Today on the show, how a New Hampshire hotel filled with boozing economists saved the global economy.

#553: The Dollar At The Center Of The World

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Maringouin, Louisiana is a town of about 1,100 people Noel King/NPR hide caption

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#767: Georgetown, Louisiana, Part Two

In 1838, the Maryland Jesuits sold 272 people, slaves, to pay the debts of Georgetown University. We talk with the descendants about what - if anything - they're owed.

#767: Georgetown, Louisiana, Part Two

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A statue of John Carroll, founder of Georgetown University, sits before Healy Hall on the school's campus. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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#766: Georgetown, Louisiana, Part One

For the residents of a small Louisiana town, there's always been a question about their past: How'd they get there? Solving the mystery only raised more questions.

#766: Georgetown, Louisiana, Part One

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We figure out where holidays like National Potato Chip Day and Argyle Day come from. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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#765: The Holiday Industrial Complex

Where do holidays like National Potato Chip Day and Argyle Day come from? We trace the roots of one made-up holiday until we find out who is running the global holiday machine.

#765: The Holiday Industrial Complex

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