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Madison McFerrin performs for a Key Studio Session at WXPN Jamie Stow/WXPN hide caption

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Jamie Stow/WXPN

Madison McFerrin On World Cafe

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Justin Bieber, photographed with fans at the premiere of his self-produced YouTube documentary series Seasons, on Jan. 27, 2020 in Los Angeles. The pop star released his first album in five years, Changes, on Feb. 14. Jon Kopaloff/Getty Images hide caption

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Jon Kopaloff/Getty Images

"I feel like I've always been referencing back to those dark childlike adventure stories," Natasha Khan says of the '80s films that inspired the latest Bat for Lashes album, Lost Girls. Logan White/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Logan White/Courtesy of the artist

On 'Lost Girls,' Bat For Lashes Spins A Vampire Fairy Tale With Synth-Pop

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Harry Nilsson's concept album The Point — about a round-headed boy in a world where everything is pointy — turns 50 this year. Stan Meagher/Getty Images hide caption

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Stan Meagher/Getty Images

50 Years Of 'The Point,' Harry Nilsson's Wonderful, Weird Musical Fable

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The Paramount Theater in Charlottesville, Va., hosted live performances for World Cafe's Sense of Place episodes this past week. Ashley Travis/WNRN hide caption

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Desiré Moses On World Cafe

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Green Gartside of Scritti Politti, the band best known for the 1985 hit "Perfect Way." Music writer Maura Johnston argues that we should explore more of Gartside's work, which bridged punk and pop. Tom Sheehan /Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Tom Sheehan /Courtesy of the artist

Scritti Politti And The Punk/Pop Inflection Point

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Kate Bollinger Amber Carpenter/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Amber Carpenter/Courtesy of the artist

Kate Bollinger On World Cafe

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The title of James Taylor's audio memoir Break Shot refers to the first shot in a game of pool when order is suddenly broken. "That seemed like an apt metaphor for what happened to my family," he says. Norman Seeff/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Norman Seeff/Courtesy of the artist

James Taylor Narrates Life Before Fame And Sings American Standards On New Album

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Justin Bieber, photographed during the 2018 NBA All-Star Celebrity Game at Los Angeles Convention Center on February 16, 2018. Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images hide caption

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Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images

"A lot of this music, for me, was the therapy along the journey of finding who I am and really discovering my self worth," SayGrace says of her new EP, The Defining Moments of SayGrace. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

On A New EP, SayGrace Breaks Down Her 'Defining Moments'

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Leif Vollebekk performing live for World Cafe Jamie Stow/WXPN hide caption

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Leif Vollebekk On World Cafe

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Four of the most-nominated artists at the 62nd annual Grammy Awards — (from left to right) Billie Eilish, Lizzo, Lil Nas X, and Finneas O'Connell — pose in the audience during the broadcast. Emma McIntyre/Getty Images for The Recording Academy hide caption

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Emma McIntyre/Getty Images for The Recording Academy

Rare, Selena Gomez's first new album in over four years, is out now. "When you take that long of a break, it is pretty nerve-wracking," she says. Rich Fury/Getty Images hide caption

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Selena Gomez On Recapturing Her Public Image, Mental Health And Her No. 1 Album

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