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Religious leaders and activists from Church World Service hold up a door, closed to refugees, during a protest urging congress to pressure US President Donald Trump to allow more refugees to enter in front of the Capitol in September. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images

Opposition To Refugee Arrivals Keeps Getting Louder

Critics of the U.S. refugee program say they want more control over who's coming to live in their towns. In Poughkeepsie, N.Y., the debate got ugly.

Dr. Terry Horton, chief of addiction medicine and medical director of Project Engage at Christiana Care Health System, testified about opioid addiction before a U.S. Senate committee in May. Courtesy of Christiana Care Health System hide caption

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Courtesy of Christiana Care Health System

Asking About Opioids: A Treatment Plan Can Make All The Difference

Is it worthwhile for doctors to screen all the patients who come through the door about their use of opioids? Usually not, but direct connections to treatment can change the equation.

Asking About Opioids: A Treatment Plan Can Make All The Difference

Audio will be available later today.

FCC Chairman Ajit Pai has unveiled his plan to undo the 2015 "net neutrality" rules that had placed Internet providers under the strictest-ever regulatory oversight. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

FCC Unveils Plan To Repeal Net Neutrality Rules

The FCC will vote Dec. 14 on a plan to undo rules that prevent Internet providers from blocking or slowing websites and apps. The plan would require broadband providers to disclose their practices.

An ATF agent poses with homemade rifles, or "ghost guns," at an agency field office in Glendale, Calif. There's a growing industry of companies that sell gun kits, instructions and do-it-yourself components online to help people build their own guns. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

Do-It-Yourself 'Ghost Guns' Bypass Background Checks And Firearm Registration

NCPR

When Kevin Neal went on his deadly shooting rampage last week in California, he used "ghost guns": homemade weapons built from kits and instructions found on the Internet.

Do-It-Yourself 'Ghost Guns' Bypass Background Checks And Firearm Registration

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There are many different ways to hold a divining rod or dowsing rod. Some people prefer to "witch" for water with a pendulum. The practice relies on the idea that the object will suddenly move when a person passes over water. Traite De La Physique Occulte/Bettmann Archive hide caption

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Traite De La Physique Occulte/Bettmann Archive

U.K. Water Companies Sometimes Use Dowsing Rods To Find Pipes

Biologist Sally Le Page couldn't believe it when she heard a folk magic practice was being used to look for water mains in 2017. But 10 out of 12 companies confirmed they sometimes rely on divining.

A new report reveals how the industry influenced research in the 1960s to deflect concerns about the impact of sugar on health — including pulling the plug on a study it funded. Karen M. Romanko/Getty Images hide caption

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Karen M. Romanko/Getty Images

What The Industry Knew About Sugar's Health Effects, But Didn't Say

The sugar industry pulled the plug on an animal study it funded in the 1960s. Initial results pointed to a link between sugar consumption and elevated triglycerides, which raises heart disease risk.

What The Industry Knew About Sugar's Health Effects, But Didn't Tell Us

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Multiple lawsuits have been filed by victims of the Oct. 1 mass shooting in Las Vegas. The company that owns the Mandalay Bay, MGM Resorts International, is among the parties being sued. Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images

Hundreds Of Victims Of Las Vegas Shooting File Lawsuits

Defendants in the suits include MGM Resorts International, which owns the Mandalay Bay, and Live Nation, the organizer of the country music festival where 58 people were killed last month.

Virginia's Board of Elections has delayed certification of ballots for two districts two weeks after elections there. Ballots in the 28th and 88th house districts are contested after a mix-up. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Virginia Delays Vote Certification After Error In Ballot Distribution

The state's Board of Elections voted to delay certification of election results for the 28th and 88th House of Delegates districts amid allegations of incorrect ballot distribution.

Camille Miller (left) is still trying to adjust to her new life in a retirement community. She gets advice from Morris Gordon, who made a similar move earlier this year. Patti English; Nicole Acevedo hide caption

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Patti English; Nicole Acevedo

Adjusting To Life In A Retirement Home 'Not As Scary As I Thought'

Camille Miller just left her home of 35 years and moved into a senior housing community. Morris Gordon made the same move earlier this year, and is happier and more active than he expected to be.

Adjusting To Life In A Retirement Home 'Not As Scary As I Thought'

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On Twitter on July 26, President Trump declared that transgender individuals would not be allowed to serve in the military, contrary to a policy announced by the Pentagon last year. Now 5 trans service members have sued over the announcement. J. David Ake/AP hide caption

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J. David Ake/AP

Second Federal Judge Blocks Trump's Ban On Trans Service Members

A judge in Maryland has blocked President Trump's planned change to the military policy on transgender service members in its entirety. Another judge blocked most of the measure just a few weeks ago.