Ault Mayor Butch White stands on a road dividing two farms, one irrigated and one dried up. Liz Baker hide caption

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U.S.

In Colorado, Farmers and Cities Battle Over Water Rights

In 1985 the city of Thornton, Colo. bought up nearby farmland and water rights from its farms. Now, some of those farms are drying up.

In Colorado, Farmers and Cities Battle Over Water Rights
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NPR Ed

How To Fix A Graduation Rate Of 1 In 10? Ask The Dropouts

Across the country, public universities are struggling with abysmal graduation rates. Here's one campus — San Jose State University — that's trying to do something about it.

How To Fix A Graduation Rate Of 1 In 10? Ask The Dropouts
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Brazilians protest in front of the Legislative Assembly of Rio de Janeiro on Friday against an alleged gang rape that police say they are investigating. Vanderlei Almeida/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The Two-Way - News Blog

Outcry Follows Gang Rape In Brazil, Raising Alarms About Sexual Violence

Police say they are investigating the possible rape of a 16-year-old girl by at least 30 men — and an online video. Activists are calling attention to violence against women in the country.

A man uses a vegetable container to carry currency notes in a market in Caracas on May 21. Amid a crushing economic crisis and triple-digit inflation, Venezuela's bolivar has lost so much value that the largest bill, the 100-bolivar note, is now worth less than a dime on the black market. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Parallels - World News

In Venezuela, Devalued Money May Weigh More Than Whatever You Can Buy

Reporter John Otis reflects on the changes in Venezuela since he first arrived there 19 years ago. The country now confronts triple-digit inflation and its largest bank note is worth less than a dime.

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Shots - Health News

Ship That Breast Milk For You? Companies Add Parent-Friendly Perks

Forget paid parental leave. Some companies offer compensation for surrogacy and adoption, or help traveling mothers send breast milk home. The benefits are a relatively cheap way to recruit and retain.

Ship That Breast Milk For You? Companies Add Parent-Friendly Perks
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The Accidentals wrote "Michigan And Again" on a fan's suggestion, as a love song for the members' home state. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Music Interviews

The Accidentals Come Home To Michigan

The young band recently released a single called "Michigan And Again." Though the band's three members do love their home state, the inspiration for the song came from an unlikely source.

The Accidentals Come Home To Michigan
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The Probuphine implant delivers medication for six months. It helps reduce cravings for people with opioid use disorder. Courtesy of Braeburn Pharmaceuticals hide caption

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Shots - Health News

Long-Acting Opioid Treatment Could Be Available In A Month

WBUR

The FDA has approved the Probuphine implant for medication-assisted therapy for opioid addiction. It lasts for six months, compared to daily pills. But it also will be more expensive.

Long-Acting Opioid Treatment Could Be Available In A Month
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"Danger, Will Robinson!" The danger-sensing abilities of the newly developed robot system far exceed those of the Robot in the classic TV series "Lost in Space." Bettmann/Bettmann Archive hide caption

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The Two-Way - News Blog

AI? More Like Aieeee!! For The First Time, A Robot Can Feel Pain

The German researchers say this will keep robots safer, because "pain is a system that protects us." Added bonus: they say the humans who work alongside them are likely to be safer, too.

Crew chief Donny Stewart (far right) throws his air gun back towards the wall at the end of a pit stop at the Firestone Grand Prix of St. Petersburg, Fla. Luis M. Alvarez/AP hide caption

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Sports

Slammed, Hurled and Pummeled: The Life Of A Pit Crew

It takes an IndyCar pit crew about seven seconds to replace four tires and refuel. It's high stakes on race day and a lot can go wrong in the pits. One misstep can cost a race — or worse.

Slammed, Hurled and Pummeled: The Life Of A Pit Crew
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Kent Family Growers is located on a small parcel outside a college town in upstate New York. Farmers from California to North Carolina have complained of delays in the H-2A visa program for temporary agricultural jobs. Lauren Rosenthal/NCPR hide caption

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The Salt

Farmers Wait, And Wait, For Guest Workers Amid H-2A Visa Delays

NCPR

For the third year in a row, the H-2A visa program is running behind. That's left farmers waiting for planters and pickers even as the harvest season is well underway.

Russia and China were among the 10 countries voting against the press freedom group's application for U.N. credentials. But South Africa indicated on Friday that it would reverse its "no" vote. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Parallels - World News

U.N. Panel Blocks Accreditation Bid By Committee To Protect Journalists

The Committee to Protect Journalists confronted a "Kafka-esque" process — put off for years, then blocked by countries including China, which it calls the biggest jailer of journalists in the world.