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James Meadours (left), Debbie Robinson and Thomas Mangrum share their stories about sexual assault. Lizzie Chen for NPR; Claire Harbage and Meg Anderson/NPR hide caption

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Lizzie Chen for NPR; Claire Harbage and Meg Anderson/NPR

In Their Own Words: People With Intellectual Disabilities Talk About Rape

In the final piece of NPR's series on the sexual assault epidemic against people with intellectual disabilities, we hear from victims themselves about how these experiences shape their lives.

In Their Own Words: People With Intellectual Disabilities Talk About Rape

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Former gymnast Rachael Denhollander was the first woman to file a criminal complaint against Larry Nassar, the former doctor for USA Gymnastics. Nassar has admitted to sexually assaulting minors. Chris Carlson/AP hide caption

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Chris Carlson/AP

Sexual Assault Survivor Speaks Out Against Former USA Gymnastics Doctor

Rachael Denhollander was the first woman to file a criminal complaint against former USA Gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar. She will be the last survivor to speak at his sentencing hearing in Michigan.

Sexual Assault Survivor Speaks Out Against Former USA Gymnastics Doctor

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Christine Caria in her home, holding a picture of her as a child in Lake Tahoe. It's her "happy place" that she thinks of when traumatic thoughts get into her head. Leila Fadel/NPR hide caption

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Leila Fadel/NPR

Victims Of Las Vegas Shooting: We Need More Help

A fund set up to help the victims of the mass shooting in Las Vegas isn't getting the same kind of donations other funds in devastating tragedies have gotten.

Victims Of Las Vegas Shooting: We Need More Help

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Formed in 1965, Jane was an underground network in Chicago that counseled and helped women who wanted to have abortions. (From left) Martha Scott, Jeanne Galatzer-Levy, Abby Parisers, Sheila Smith and Madeline Schwenk were among the seven members of Jane arrested in 1972. Courtesy of Martha Scott hide caption

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Courtesy of Martha Scott

Before 'Roe v. Wade,' The Women of 'Jane' Provided Abortions For The Women Of Chicago

In 1965, a group known as Jane began connecting pregnant women in Chicago with doctors willing to perform abortions. Jane members later learned to perform the procedure, making it more accessible.

Before 'Roe v. Wade,' The Women of 'Jane' Provided Abortions For The Women Of Chicago

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Stormy Daniels appears at the Wicked Pictures booth at the 2017 AVN Adult Entertainment Expo at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino on January 18, 2017, in Las Vegas, Nev. Ethan Miller/Getty Images hide caption

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Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Get Caught Up: Trump's Alleged Affair With Adult Film Star Stormy Daniels

In 2011, the actress and former Senate candidate told In Touch magazine about a years-earlier sexual encounter with Donald Trump. Now, she and the president both deny an affair.

Rosa Cruz and Luis Felipe Colón standing beneath the newly illuminated light on their front porch. The couple had been without electricity for four months. Adrian Florido/NPR hide caption

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Adrian Florido/NPR

After Months Without Power, A Town In Puerto Rico Strings Its Own Lines

The Pepino Power Authority of Puerto Rico is a volunteer band of citizens restoring power on their own. The island's electric utility says their work is illegal. Residents don't care.

After Four Months Without Power, A Puerto Rico Town Strings Its Own Lines

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Long-time locals in Orofino, Idaho, like to boast that their town was built by natural resources, and for the most part, that's what keeps the economy going today. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

1 Year After Trump, Some In Rural West Still Feel Disconnect With Washington

President Trump promised to be a champion for rural America. But his plan to cut rural development funds causes anxiety in at least one timber country town that's struggling to diversify its economy.

1 Year After Trump, Some In Rural West Still Feel Disconnect With Washington

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published a 2017 report that found wild-caught salmon caught off the coast of Alaska may contain a Japanese tapeworm, rarely seen in the U.S. Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images

Man Pulls 5 1/2-Foot-Long Tapeworm Out Of His Body, Blames Sushi Habit

A recent podcast episode shared, in grisly detail, the story of a California man who discovered a parasitic worm wriggling out of him. He and his doctor suspect raw salmon was the culprit.

Approval of U.S. leadership fell sharply in President Trump's first year — particularly in Canada, where the approval rating fell from 60 percent to 20 percent. In this photo, protesters demonstrate at a new Trump International hotel in Vancouver last year. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

World's Regard For U.S. Leadership Hits Record Low In Gallup Poll

The global approval rating for U.S. leadership fell to 30 percent — lower in President Trump's first year in office than under former President George W. Bush and a sharp fall from the Obama era.

Musician M. Ward says he owes a lot of his success to being played on "triple A" radio stations. Sarah Cass/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Sarah Cass/Courtesy of the artist

At 'Triple A' Radio Stations, A Blurred Line Between Discovery And Promotion

Created as alternatives to the hitmaking monoliths of commercial radio, AAA stations have pushed artists like Lorde into the mainstream. Now, they're facing pressure to pick tomorrow's hits.

At 'Triple A' Radio Stations, A Blurred Line Between Discovery And Promotion

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Of the people in this Oval Office photo from Jan. 28, 2017, only President Trump and Vice President Pence are still part of the administration. Reince Priebus, Steve Bannon, Sean Spicer and Michael Flynn have all left. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Turnover In Trump's White House Is 'Record-Setting,' And It Isn't Even Close

In Trump's first year in office, 34 percent of top aides have either resigned, been fired or moved to different positions. That level of turmoil is off the charts compared with recent presidencies.

Turnover In Trump's White House Is 'Record-Setting,' And It Isn't Even Close

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