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Twitter says it is investigating the coordinated hack, which attacked the accounts of some of the richest and most popular names on the social media platform. Alastair Pike/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Alastair Pike/AFP via Getty Images

Twitter Says It Was The Victim Of A 'Coordinated Social Engineering Attack'

Twitter confirms to NPR that it is investigating the coordinated hack, which attacked the accounts of some of the richest and most popular names on Twitter and may have reaped more than $100,000.

The Asheville, N.C., city council unanimously approved a resolution apologizing for the local government's historic role in slavery and for participating in racist and discriminatory policies that have led to the oppression of African Americans. Walter Bibikow/Getty Images hide caption

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Walter Bibikow/Getty Images

Asheville, N.C., Approves Steps Toward Reparations For Black Residents

"The blood capital that we have banked to spend today to fight for significant change came ... not from our allies but from Black men, women and children who died," said Councilman Keith Young.

Youths perform in front of a cellphone camera while making a TikTok video on the roof of their residence in Hyderabad, India, in February. India's government has banned 59 Chinese-owned apps including TikTok. Noah Seelam/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Noah Seelam/AFP via Getty Images

'TikTok Changed My Life': India's Ban On Chinese App Leaves Video Makers Stunned

Some Indians became known TikTok personalities and even earned money and gifts for their content. The government banned the app as tensions flare with China.

'TikTok Changed My Life': India's Ban On Chinese App Leaves Video Makers Stunned

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White House economic adviser Peter Navarro (center, left) and Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, stand back to back after a White House Coronavirus Task Force briefing on March 9. Navarro wrote an opinion article criticizing Fauci. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

'He Shouldn't Be Doing That': Trump Weighs In On Navarro Op-Ed Attacking Fauci

The White House has disavowed a USA Today opinion piece by trade adviser Peter Navarro, who says Fauci has been wrong about the coronavirus. Fauci tells The Atlantic the attacks are "bizarre."

Dozens of fans turned out to watch the Red Sox amateur baseball team tangle with the Yankees at Regions Field in Birmingham, Ala. The teams are part of an over-35 league showcasing their skills at a ballpark normally used by the Birmingham Barons minor league baseball team. Russell Lewis/NPR hide caption

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Russell Lewis/NPR

Baseball-Starved Fans Turn Out To Watch Middle-Aged Men Play

With Major League Baseball games to be played in empty stadiums, and the minor league season cancelled, fans are showing up at amateur leagues.

The Department of Veterans Affairs blocked the University of Phoenix, Perdoceo Education Corporation, Bellevue University and Temple University, from enrolling GI Bill students after the Federal Trade Commission laid enormous penalties on them for deceptive advertising. Alastair Pike/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Alastair Pike/AFP via Getty Images

Trump Administration Clears For-Profit Colleges To Register Veterans Again

The Department of Veterans Affairs is no longer blocking several for-profit schools the Federal Trade Commission penalized for deceptive advertising from enrolling GI Bill students.

Trump Administration Clears For-Profit Colleges To Register Veterans Again

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A U.S. Government Accountability Office report finds congressionally approved emergency humanitarian funds, meant to benefit asylum-seekers apprehended along the border with Mexico, instead was spent on things from dirt bikes to security camera systems. GAO Homeland Security and Justice Director Rebecca Gambler, shown here in 2017, oversaw the agency's investigation. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Government Watchdog Says Aid For Migrants Misspent By Border Agency

Some of the $112 million Congress approved last year for humanitarian assistance for migrants was spent instead on dirt bikes and dog food.

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Bars, like this boarded-up pub in Dublin, closed in March. They can open their doors again in Phase Four of Ireland's reopening plan, which is newly delayed until August. Paul Faith/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Faith/AFP via Getty Images

Ireland Delays Further Reopening, Keeping Bars Closed As Case Numbers Grow

Prime Minister Micheál Martin said on Wednesday that current restrictions will remain in place until Aug. 10. The country had been set to begin the final phase of its reopening plan on July 20.

Gonzalo Inclán and Enfrén Carreño of the Liceo Europeo school just outside of Madrid, Spain measure the space between desks in May. Miguel Pereira/Getty Images hide caption

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Miguel Pereira/Getty Images

Is School Safe? Will Districts Test For COVID-19? Answering Back-To-School Questions

NPR science and education reporters answer questions submitted by listeners about the coming school year.

Is School Safe? Will Districts Test For COVID-19? Answering Back-To-School Questions

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Ten artists from Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean recorded tracks using birdsong from their country, with all profits of the vinyl and digital release going to bird conservation projects. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

A New Album Turns The Sound Of Endangered Birds Into Electronic Music

Ten artists from Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean recorded tracks using birdsong from their country, with all profits of the vinyl and digital release going to bird conservation projects.

A New Album Turns The Sound Of Endangered Birds Into Electronic Music

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Medical staff in Mumbai, India, last week. A U.N. report warns that the coronavirus pandemic is interfering with children getting vaccinated. Anshuman Poyrekar/Hindustan Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Anshuman Poyrekar/Hindustan Times via Getty Images

U.N. Points To 'Alarming Decline' In Child Vaccinations

It warned of the first drop in 28 years for vaccinations against diptheria, tetanus and pertussis — a marker for immunization coverage — based on preliminary data from the first four months of 2020.

A dirt road cuts through a sprawling Doctors Without Borders camp in South Sudan. In a letter, 1,000 current and former employees are accusing the aid group of racism and white supremacy. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

Doctors Without Borders Responds To Charges Of 'Racism' From Its Staff

The concerns range from condescending attitudes toward people of color to inequities of pay between international and local workers. The aid group's leaders have pledged to address the issues.

Puerto Rican nationalists Irvin Flores Rodriguez, Rafael Cancel Miranda, Lolita Lebron, and Andres Figueroa Cordero, standing in a police lineup following their arrest after a shooting attack on the U.S. Capitol, March 1, 1954. AP hide caption

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AP

Borinquén

Puerto Rico became a U.S. territory in 1898. We examine Puerto Rico's relationship with the U.S. mainland and the key figures who shaped the island's fate.

Borinquén

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