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Bernie Sanders departs the U.S. Capitol following a vote on a historic $2 trillion rescue plan to respond to the economic and health crisis caused by the coronavirus pandemic. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Facing Likely Defeat, Bernie Sanders' Campaign Found A New Cause

It looked like Sanders was about to drop out of the Democratic primary, until the coronovairus crisis gave his agenda a boost and turned his campaign into a relief drive. But what's next?

Facing Likely Defeat, Bernie Sanders' Campaign Found A New Cause

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During his remarks to reporters before his departure to Norfolk, Va., President Trump said outside the White House that there was a "possibility that sometime today" there will be a two-week quarantine on parts of New York, Connecticut and New Jersey. Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images

Trump Issues Travel Advisory, Not Quarantine, For New York, New Jersey, Connecticut

The president's decision came hours after floating the possibility that he would issue quarantines for the hard-hit states. The CDC later advised residents against non-essential travel for 14 days.

Across the country, the coronavirus has forced many animal shelters into crisis mode. Above, a dogs at the Humane Society of Harlingen, Texas which has since found a home. Sara Cano/ Humane Society of Harlingen, Texas hide caption

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Sara Cano/ Humane Society of Harlingen, Texas

Animal Shelters Urge Humans Confined To Home By Coronavirus Outbreak To Adopt

As states issue stay-at-home orders, animal shelters have had to close their doors. They're coming up with new ways to find homes as they brace for an onslaught of puppies and kittens.

Dua Lipa released her album Future Nostalgia a week ahead of schedule."I want people to be able to take a moment away from what's going on outside. I hope it gives them some happiness," she says. Hugo Comte/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Hugo Comte/Courtesy of the artist

Dua Lipa Hopes 'Future Nostalgia' Will Let You Dance During Self-Quarantine

NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro speaks with the pop star and songwriter about releasing her new album, Future Nostalgia, a week early and learning to connect with an audience during social isolation.

A photograph from 1940, taken for infectious research purposes at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, shows respiratory droplets released through sneezing. Bettmann/Bettmann Archive hide caption

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Bettmann/Bettmann Archive

WHO Reviews 'Current' Evidence On Coronavirus Transmission Through Air

A scientific brief from the World Health Organization says "current evidence" points to infectious respiratory droplets passed in "close contact" situations, but some say it's too soon to be sure

After an initial verbal screening, one driver at a time gets a COVID-19 nasal swab test from a garbed health worker at a drive-up station in Daly City, Calif. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Why It Takes So Long To Get Most COVID-19 Test Results

Kaiser Health News

Even many symptomatic patients and exposed health workers who are able to get a COVID-19 test must wait nearly a week to get results. Others get results in hours. Here's why it varies so much.

Cameron Esposito speaks at the GLAAD Media Awards on April 1, 2017 in Beverly Hills, Calif. Emma McIntyre/Getty Images for GLAAD hide caption

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Emma McIntyre/Getty Images for GLAAD

'Save Yourself': Cameron Esposito Is Here To Help You Through Hard Times

The comic couldn't have known her memoir would come out in the midst of a global pandemic. But her aptly titled book includes observations that feel eerily pertinent to these unsettling days.

'Save Yourself': Cameron Esposito Is Here To Help You Through Hard Times

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A screen grab from a social media video shows a tornado tearing through Jonesboro, Ark., on Saturday. Said Said/Triples S Phone and Computer Repair/via REUTERS hide caption

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Said Said/Triples S Phone and Computer Repair/via REUTERS

Tornado Strikes Arkansas City; Officials Say Pandemic Closures Kept People Safe

The tornado injured at least 22 people and caused extensive damage to many properties. Officials attribute the relatively low number of casualties in part to social distancing and business shutdowns.

Fiona is a 3-year-old, 1,300-pound hippo, and she's a growing girl. Her keeper, Jenna Wingate, is grateful to be able to work during the coronavirus crisis: "It feels good to be needed," she says. Lisa Hubbard/Cincinnati Zoo hide caption

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Lisa Hubbard/Cincinnati Zoo

Who Feeds Fiona? Cincinnati Zookeepers Make Sure There Are No Hungry Hippos

Fiona is a 3-year-old, 1,300-pound hippo, and she's a growing girl. Her keeper, Jenna Wingate, is grateful to be able to work during the coronavirus crisis: "It feels good to be needed," she says.

Who Feeds Fiona? Cincinnati Zookeepers Make Sure There Are No Hungry Hippos

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A staffer checks on a ventilator in an intensive care unit in Chennai, India, Friday. States in the U.S. are coming up with plans for what to do if they run out of ventilators and other supplies. Arun Sankar/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Arun Sankar/AFP via Getty Images

HHS Warns States Not To Put People With Disabilities At The Back Of The Line For Care

States are preparing guidelines for when there's not enough care to go around. Disability groups are worried that those standards will allow rationing that excludes people with disabilities.

HHS Warns States Not To Put People With Disabilities At The Back Of The Line For Care

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Members of the Arizona National Guard distribute food on March 27 in Mesa, Ariz. The Guard has been activated to bolster the supply chain and distribution of food amid surging demand in response to the COVID-19 coronavirus outbreak. Matt York/AP hide caption

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Matt York/AP

Closures, Benefits And Takeout: Here's How Each State Is Battling Coronavirus

State leaders are taking a variety of approaches to fighting the global pandemic — from stay-at-home orders to county-by-county directives. Check out how your state is trying to keep residents safe.

People in Wuhan, China, line up at a facility that tests discharged COVID-19 patients as well as individuals who'd been held in isolation. Barcroft Media via Getty Images hide caption

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Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Mystery In Wuhan: Recovered Coronavirus Patients Test Negative ... Then Positive

NPR interviewed four residents of Wuhan who contracted the virus, recovered — but then had a re-test that turned positive. What does that mean for China's recovery from COVID-19?

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